Social Media Review: Lollapalooza

Have you ever realized how weird some music festival names are?  Like, who thinks of these?

Up next in the “Social Media Review” series: Lollapalooza in Grant Park, Chicago!

It’s hard for me to describe the vibe that I get after looking at Lolla’s color scheme and general website theme.  Almost like urban psychedelic?  The cartoonish themes remind me of Foster the People’s Supermodel mural, but the colors add a sort of urbaLolla Social Media 2n twist to it.  I’m sure I made no sense at all and sound just as high as most of the festival’s attendees.  As I quickly scroll through Lolla’s social media accounts, I see a healthy mix of videos, photos, and fan engagement.  Briefly skimming over the content, I do not see many social equity posts, which help establish brand personality traits.  However, Lolla’s selective choice of responding to fans somewhat serve as a quick-fix to this since its responses to fans help build its brand.

Lolla Social MediaPros:

  • Great use of other forms of media- articles, photos, videos.  By posting things other than photos at the actual festival, it keeps the content fresh and exciting.

Lolla Social Media 3

  • Lolla, like Bonnaroo and Coachella, promotes artists featured in the lineup by sharing articles and/or videos featuring the artist.
  • The articles the music festival posts and shares do not just relate to the artist, but the entire music industry/community.  For example, Lolla posted an article about how science may have discovered why humans make music.  Personally, just by following and “liking” Lollapalooza on social media accounts, I have learned so much about music and the industry.

Cons:

  • The Lolla “voice” that I picked up on after reading through some posts was one of sass.  Because Lolla promotes it featured artists so much, it can often go through periods of not posting anything else besides that.
  • Lolla definitely needs to work on extending its brand personality.  Right now, when Lolla posts, I can’t actually attribute a personality trait to the brand.
  • More photos and video clips of actually being at the music festival — help me pretend I was there by posting about the experience of it all.Lolla Social Media 4

Lollapalooza’s social medias definitely show promising growth, but there was nothing that really *WOW’ed* me.  After reviewing 3 other music festival social media accounts, it’s easy to see now how difficult it is to differentiate a music festival from the others.  It’s amazing that Lolla posts articles not only relevant to a specific artist, but to any music-lover.  However, Lolla definitely has to work on curating more content that helps build the brand.

Overall score: 7 — Once Lolla builds its brand and social media “voice,” its score will definitely increase.

Stay tuned,

Roxanne

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Party at the Puddle: Social Media Promo Plan

RUPA promoted events through all channels (digital, in-person, and print), but our presence is most prevalent on social media.  We drop all events first on Facebook and Twitter.  Given that social media is our primary means of promotion, I build in Party at the Puddle supporting posts in the Marketing committee’s social media content calendar for April.  Each month, I make a content calendar that dictates what type of post should be posted and when so that our social media accounts are not over saturated with event promotion.  The first few posts I assigned to Taylor, the Traditions & Community MAD, since Party at the Puddle is primarily a T&C event with a music portion.  The remaining posts I assigned to myself in order to promote each of the artists performing, much like Bonnaroo and Coachella do.

Original photo was accidentally deleted; current replacement photo taken on 5/3.

Can this technically be considered Rutgers’ mini music and arts festival? *Original photo was accidentally deleted; current replacement photo taken on 5/3.

So far, the event’s social media presence continues to grow given that over 2,000 students (almost 3,000 students) have RSVP’ed “Going” to the event.  Since the Concerts & Coffeehouses committee had extra money left over from Beats on the Banks and we are now expecting close to 3k people, we are doubling the food budget and ordering more food to accommodate the expected turnout.

This is totally going to be a mini music festival… but minus the flower crowns and floppy hats.

Stay tuned,

Roxanne

Party at the Puddle: Facebook Attendance

It’s only been TWO days since Party at the Puddle officially dropped on Facebook, but the event already has over one thousand people RSVP’ed as “Going”!  Of course, how reliable is a Facebook RSVP really though?  Still, it’s incredible to see the event get so much attention in a liParty at the Puddle Facebook Event Pgmited amount of time.

The impact of successful events on brand equity is exceptionally important.  In a study done by Zarantonello and Schmitt (2013), “event attendance has a positive impact on brand equity” (p. 255).  Events give attendees the chance to directly interact with and experience the brand.  Successful, meaningful events can change audiences’ perceptions of the entire brand.  Being at an event usually means “being fully immersed in a physical space that stimulates all consumers’ senses, and encourages them to be active participants and to interact with the surrounding environment” (Zarantonello & Schmitt, 2013, p. 261).  Wanting event attendees to have a complete experience, we/RUPA is strategically and creatively planning and preparing for Party at the Puddle.  We will have free food (calling all broke college students), carnival games (even a dunk tank!), arts and crafts (who wouldn’t want to do a craft involving a mason jar?), and of course- live music!

If Facebook attendance continues to grow and is any sign of how many people will actually be there, this event will really impact how attendees experience RUPA.  A major part of how we plan events is how we think the attendees will experience the event.  To us, it’s now just about the artist performing or the notable person speaking or giving a lecture, it’s about what attendees will remember and feel.  At the very first RUPA event I worked (Beats on the Banks ft. Alesso), I remember the good music and amazing production, but the memory that stands out the most to me is looking out at the crowd and feeling a sense of cohesiveness — there were over 4,000 diverse students of all different ethnicities, majors, minors, towns, etc., but here we were all dancing and enjoying the same concert.

If there is anything I hope to accomplish with Party at the Puddle, I hope to help people and friends make memories.

Stay tuned,

Roxanne

RUPA Presents: Party at the Puddle

Yup, RUPA is hosting a party at Passion Puddle on Thursday, April 30th.

Similar to the Fall’s Scarlet Harvest, which includes live music, free food, arts & crafts, and other fun activities (i.e., bull riding), Party at the Puddle serves as a celebration of nice weather and the end of the semester (finally).  As part of my Capstone, I will be planning the music portion of the event.  I will also be in charge of creating a promotion plan for Party at the Puddle.  What better way to understand social media promotion (when it comes to music events) than to plan and promote one yourself?

Along with promoting the event itself, I plan to promote each of the respective local New Brunswick bands’ Facebook and Bandcamp or Spotify pages.  I will incorporate all types of marketing in my Party at the Puddle promotion plan including:

  • Digital marketing (HEAVY social media promotion)
  • Print marketing (flyers on RUPA bulletin boards)
  • In-person marketing (street teams)

At the event, I will be distributing a short anonymous survey to as many attendees as possible in order to analyze and determine what form of promotion was the most effective in attracting attendees.  Based on the answers we have heard in the past via focus groups, I predict that social media will be the main source of attendees’ knowledge of the event.

Since social media is RUPA’s strongest form of marketing, we drop all of our events via Facebook and Twitter first.  Given that Party at the Puddle just dropped today, the Facebook “Going” RSVPs and invites seem to be growing at a healthy pace if not faster than normal.  A big factor could be the name of the event.  Personally speaking, if I saw an event named “Party at the Puddle,” I would be kind of confused and prompted to click on the event page.  The event name itself is click-bait!  As a side note, it was NOT easy to name this event.  At first, I was hell-bent on naming it “New Funswick” because why not?  At the end of the day, though, I couldn’t be happier with the event name — it matches the event’s upbeat, laid-back vibe.

This is an actual photo of Passion Puddle. Desktop wallpaper worthy, am I right?!

This is an actual photo of Passion Puddle. Desktop wallpaper worthy, am I right?!

Also, the fact that RUPA is hosting an event at Passion Puddle could be enough to attract attention since no other event is held in that area.  According to Hoyle (2002), the venue or event location can “dictate not just the attendance, but the character and personality of the event as well” (p. 15).  While framing events in a certain light is also important when promoting, having quality raw materials is equally as important.  We knew that we needed to somehow incorporate “Passion Puddle” in the event title to attract attention and place emphasis on the cool, unique location.  Beautiful weather (*KNOCK ON WOOD*), live music, tasty food, fun carnival games, and friends all in such a peaceful, picturesque place makes for the best day.

Stay tuned,

Roxanne

Hoyle, L. H. (2002). Introduction to event marketing. In Event marketing: How to successfully promote events, festivals, conventions, and expositions (pp. 1-17). New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons.

 

Social Media Review: Coachella

Coachella, -ella, -ella, ay, ay, ay.

rihanna-coachella

Since I will be attending Coachella Weekend 2 soon (yup, let the jealousy settle in), it’s only right to do a social media review on one of the most popular, celebrity-filled music festivals.  As expected, Coachella has a solid following on all social media accounts.  Still not as large as Ultra’s following, but I’d imagine the most star-studded following (huh-LO, let’s not forget Leo DiCaprio’s “dance moves“):

Scrolling through Coachella’s social media accounts, I see constant use of videos and photos to both hype and prepare festival attendees.  Similar to Bonnaroo, Coachella also promotes artists as relevant content comes to surface.  After analyzing two festival social medias, Coachella is the first music festival I have reviewed that uses SpoCoachella Social Media 2tify playlists frequently to promote its lineup.  When it comes to engagement on Twitter, Coachella primarily retweets artists and lacks engagement with attendees/fans.  However, one of the coolest Coachella social media features is the artist takeover on Instagram.  For example, before Weekend 1, Kaskade was given control of the Coachella Instagram feed.  Throughout the music festival, you can see Coachella through the eyes of whoever takes over the Instagram next  — pretty cool if you ask me!

Coachella Social Media

Coachella Social media 4Coachella Social Media 3

 

 

 

 

 

Pros:

  • Coachella successfully uses multi-media platforms to catch the attention of followers.  ‘Chella is the only music festival I’ve seen so far that makes use of Spotify playlists.  The music and art festival announced its “food lineup” and its art installation process via short video.  Also, Coachella can do no wrong by posting pictures of its beautiful art installations and festival layout.  Palm trees, am I right?!
  • Coachella frequently posts reminders of activities going on or security manners.
  • INSTAGRAM TAKEOVER.  Need I say more?  I still find it so cool how users are able to see Coachella through the eyes of a different person every few hours or so.
  • GREAT day of show posts constantly providing users with minute-by-minute updates and FYIs.

Coachella Social Media 5

Cons:

  • Although Coachella’s social media accounts are definitely aesthetically pleasing, the festival needs to work on its “voice.”  While reading through tweets and posts, I didn’t really pick up on a consistent message or any brand personality traits.
  • If you couldn’t tell by now, I’m a huge advocate of fan engagement.  ‘Chella should start replying to followers/fans — by responding to fans, ‘Chella would be able to build its brand.  Connectivity is important for users/attendees at festivals, and socializing via Twitter is a way for attendees to feel connected and engaged by a brand (Jamison et. al., 2014, p. 4).Gigi-Hadid-Coachella-Style
  • Not only should ‘Chella reply to fans, but also retweet fans!  Who doesn’t love to see their post on a famous music festival’s social media page?
  • This one’s not really a con, but more of a suggestion.  Everybody knows that “Coachella fashion” is a thing.  Why isn’t Coachella capitalizing off of this more on its social media accounts?  A social media campaign can easily be started: #ChellaFashion.  I mean huh-LOW, GiGi Hadid and Kendall Jenner can be the first ones featured followed by lace-clad, no-bra wearing, hippie civilians.

I am so unbelievably excited to experience Coachella.  Its social media accounts seem to convey an ounce of the experience, but it definitely seems to be a “you had to be there” kind of concept.  I’ll be counting down the days until musical heaven aka Coachella.  Who knows?  Maybe by the time weekend 2 rolls around, #ChellaFashion will actually be a thing!  (You’re welcome in advance, Coachella!)

Overall score: — Coachella’s Instagram takeover is what really boosted the music festival’s overall score, but ultimately, the lack of “voice” is pretty detrimental to a brand.

Stay tuned,

Roxanne

Jamison-Powell, S., Mahoney, J., Bennett, L., & Lawson, S. (2014, February). Understanding in-situ social media at music festivals. Paper presented at 17th ACM conference.

Social Media Review: Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival

After taking a looking at Bonnaroo’s social media accounts, I now read the music festival as Bonnawoo (no, I will not stop with the corny dad jokes)!

Continuing with my “Social Media Review” series of various music festivals, I will be reviewing Bonnaroo’s social media presence and content.  Although I tend to follow music festivals quite closely, I will admit that I haven’t really looked at the Tennessee music festival’s social media accounts before.  Apparently, I’m in the minority according to Roo’s social media following:

These numbers seem close to the numbers I would guess that Roo probably had in terms of social media following.  It’s interesting, however, to compare the monstrous following of Ultra versus Roo (read: Social Media Review: Ultra Music Festival).  Quickly scanning over Roo’s social media accounts, I was pleasantly surprised with the content.  Roo makes good use of videos, photos, and fan engagement.  The music and arts festival keBonnaroo Social Media 4eps a consistent “voice” and message throughout all social media accounts.  I can already feel the hippie, free spirit nature of the music festival just by reading through some of its posts and viewing a couple pictures.  I respect Roo for keeping committed to their message: “RADIATE POSITIVITY.”  What I really admire about the festival’s social media accounts is that its content also includes inspirational picture quotes, artist promotion, and articles related to Roo.

Bonnaroo Social Media 5

Bonnaroo Social MediaBonnaroo Social Media 3

 

 

 

 

Pros:

  • Bonnaroo’s “voice” and brand personality is strong and established.  It’s easy to imagine Roo’s atmosphere without being there because its social media personality is so consistent.
  • Roo retweets and shares fan photos frequently.  Roo even goes a step further and replies to many fan tweets.
  • Content on Roo is never stale — the Tennessee music festival features related articles, inspirational quotes, cool photos, teaser vids, and more!
  • Roo will also post content that promotes an artist performing at the festival.  Roo will also retweet artists that are playing at the event even if the tweet does not explicitly mention/involve Bonnaroo.  Often, music festivals promote the entire lineup as a whole rather than promoting each individual artist as relevant materials arises.  For example, Roo posted a link to Florence + the Machine’s new music video, “St. Jude,” since she is one of this year’s headliners.  I plan to do this sort of promotion for my Capstone event as well.
  • Roo heavily promotes the experience of the event via pictures and articles.  Festival attendees are even referred to as “Bonnaroovians” who live under “The Bonnaroovian Code.”  The festival even compiled a “Census” based on its 2014 attendees.

Bonnaroo Social Media 2

Cons:

  • Although Roo features all types of photos from the event, a few pictures of the different stages with their respective production would be cool.
  • This is me nitpicking at this point since I can’t really think of anything majorly wrong with Roo’s social media, but using countdown visuals can help hype up event attendees.

I have never been to Bonnaroo, but their social media presence is definitely making me reconsider.  At the same time, though, their social media presence is so expertly done that I feel as if I have already ran through “The Farm” barefoot with messy hair throwing up the shaka sign and maybe a peace sign here and there as I “radiate positivity.”

Overall score: 9 — Roo’s done everything pretty much perfectly from posting relevant content to keeping attendees/fans engaged!

Stay tuned,

Roxanne

Social Media Review: Ultra Music Festival

More like ULTRA cheesy social media (hate myself only a little bit for making that joke).

As part of my Capstone, I plan to review and analyze different music festivals’ social media presence and content.  Up first: Ultra Music Festival in Miami, Florida.  Catering to a specific crowd (since Ultra is an electronic dance music festival), I predicted that Ultra’s social media following would be large, but still scaled back.  Looking at Ultra’s official Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, I could not have been more wrong.  Check out their social media following:

Clearly, there are more EDM fans than I originally assumed.  I’m extremely impressed with the music festival’s social media following, but its content?  Not so much.  Sure, Ultra posts awesome, trippy, FOMO-worthy pictures of stages with amazing production and attendees that are having the time of their life (but are also half-dressed in different variations of neon colors — this is a whole other topic though), but Ultra’s Facebook posts/tweets/Instagram captions are pretty weak and a little bit cringeworthy.  HOWEVER, the posts do cater to the majority of the music festival’s fans.  This is definitely evident through the high levels of engagement with posts, including shares, replies, retweets, favorites, and likes.

Screen Shot 2015-05-03 at 12.45.00 PM

Screen Shot 2015-05-03 at 12.46.03 PMScreen Shot 2015-05-03 at 12.47.22 PMScreen Shot 2015-05-03 at 12.57.05 PM

Pros:

  • Ultra does an excellent job at hyping up fans by posting countdown visuals, video recaps from previous years, and sensory-stimulating photos.
  • Catering to its audience, Ultra posts retweet-able or sharable content (although I would never personally retweet something that said “Ultra > anywhere else” or “Find love at ULTRA” with a picture of two neon-clad attendees kissing).
  • Across all social media accounts, Ultra’s “voice” remains consistent whether it is through picture captions or general posts.
  • Ultra makes good use of photos and videos.  By posting plenty of multi-media content, Ultra basically encourages attendees to view and share the content.
  • Ultra posts consistent reminders about tickets and security regarding the festival.  According to an article that studied festivalgoers’ use of Twitter during the Glastonbury 2013 music festival, researchers found that festivalgoers often used Twitter to coordinate locations and ask festival staff technical questions (Jamison-Powell et. al., 2014, p. 2).
My friend Erica's hilarious reaction to Ultra's social media content -- can't say I disagree with her though!

My friend Erica’s hilarious reaction to Ultra’s social media content — can’t say I disagree with her though!

Cons:

  • Ultra’s social media “voice” could use some work.
  • Looking at Ultra’s Twitter, they do engage and reply to some followers, but overall, it is not as responsive.  Ultra does, however, retweet users quite frequently.  During the music festival, Ultra should be retweeting and responding to attendees since festival attendees often use social media to “mediate and support their experiences” (Jamison-Powell et. al., 2014, p.4).
  • Its content can often get repetitive and almost stale.  One can only see so many pictures of a stage with crazy lights and caption like: “Let the lights do the talking…”
  • There were no signs or announcements to tag photos or tweets with a specific hashtag (i.e. #Ultra2015).

All of this being said, I attended Ultra this year so I was able to witness all of this firsthand.  When I had a question about something, I did not once turn to social media to ask festival organizers a question.  Besides the weak content, the music festival could really work on its day of show social media plan.

Overall score (1-10, 10 being the best): 7  Ultra’s lack of engagement and response really take away from its score.

Stay tuned,

Roxanne

Jamison-Powell, S., Mahoney, J., Bennett, L., & Lawson, S. (2014, February). Understanding in-situ social media at music festivals. Paper presented at 17th ACM conference.

RUPA Presents: Beats on the Banks ft. A-Trak

Since I will often talk about various music festivals, why not talk about Rutgers’ mini-version of a music festival?

Today, RUPA announced the headliner for Rutgers’ spring concert, Beats on the Banks, via short YouTube video.  Last year, the Director of Marketing decided to use daily visual clues to reveal the headliner, DJ Snake (i.e., a photo of snake eyes dice).  This year, I wanted to keep it simple but different.  I had just bought my Firefly tickets and watched their lineup video on YouTube.  Immediately after I watched the video, I knew I wanted to reveal the headliner via video announcement using b-roll from past Beats on the Banks shows.  To further support my decision to use a video announcement, an article I read about how to incorporate social media into event marketing confirmed that “teaser videos are great way to quickly generate interest and can be shared on any social platform” (Carter, 2015).  I also knew that posting the video on Facebook would make it more likely to appear on peoples’ timelines due to Facebook’s algorithm.

RUPA BOTB Announcement

Check out the engagement on our official announcement post!

Since it is just an announcement video, I requested that the video be somewhere between :30-:45.  The Student Life Media Team hustled to make the video in a matter of a few days since tickets go on sale in about 2 weeks (on Monday, March 23rd at 2pm via http://getinvolved.tix.com).  The video perfectly showcases the experience of Beats on the Banks in just a few seconds.  I am completely in love with the video and almost wish I wasn’t going to Coachella Weekend 2 to experience this year’s Beats on the Banks.  Also, I’ve watched the video close to 50 times already.

 

Stay tuned,

Roxanne

Carter, T. (2015, March 5). 14 tips to incorporate social media into event marketing. Retrieved March 5, 2015, from Marketing Land website: http://marketingland.com/14-tips-incorporate-social-media-event-marketing-118227